Tag Archives: lies

The Lie Detector


Yesterday I found myself watching random videos / related with related with related with related with related with related with related with related with related with related with related with related with related with related with related with related with related with related with related with related with related with related with related with the original source in Youtube, and found this one quite amusing, from Jimmy Kimmel’s show.

A child is put into a “lie detector” device (which is no less than a pan with lights turned upside down, and a pair of springs), and questioned by a police detective in presence of the Truth Fairy. Obviously, the children, being naïve, believed in the scenario and started manipulating their answers according to the device’s reaction. If it beeped (meaning they were lying) they would immediately change their answer, and say the opposite.

Child #1 in my opinion, gives the funniest answers.
Child #2 apparently really was in the moon, according to “the lie detector”.

September 15 – Lisbon

The people is sick of lies.
And got out to the street.

Facebook hoaxes

I just can’t understand how people keep believing in these “warnings” from Facebook. Today several of my Facebook friends posted about the privacy settings, telling companies they wouldn’t authorize the publication of their data. Yesterday it was about changing the privacy settings (again) of the information we share with users that aren’t our “friends”. Fake, fake, fake. And useless.

Hey, I know Facebook can be tricky, but if you try checking things out before believing in what you’re told, you might realize it’s a complete fake.

Here’s a list of the most known Facebook Hoaxes and “Time Wasting Exercises”.

Photomanipulation

Retronaut.co has posted something about photomanipulation.

How easy is it?

Image interpretation

What is this?

a) a mexican wearing a large sombrero
b) a doughnut
c) a millstone
d) a wheel 

Yup. Vision lies…

«It is surely the simplest possible representation of a Mexican wearing a large sombrero. Yet such view will be used only as a joke, which results precisely from the contradiction between the correctness and the inadequacy of the representation. The picture is certainly faithful – it can be obtained photographically from a third-floor hotel window – but it is inadequate for most purposes because it does not distinguish a Mexican from a millstone or a doughnut.»

#Rudolph Arnheim, Art and Visual Perception, 1954

Truth and Lies, by Justin Barber

«By visually representing the difference in what we often say but secretly mean, Truth and Lies uncovers the inane conversational nuances that reveal paradoxical dichotomies in our otherwise ordinary life. In other words, this is what you say, but (this is what you mean) – and we all know it.»

> > Link for the project

Common Fallacies

Interesting infographic by Information is Beautiful.

I selected some, many more are in the above link. The first image relates directly to my dissertation theme: the relationship of visual design with online perceived credibility. The rest focus on lies, truth, and ways to prove both.